(407) 588-6846
orlandomathcircle@gmail.com

Florida Math Girls

SUPPORT ORLANDO MATH CIRCLE

ENCOURAGE GIRLS TO PARTICIPATE IN MATH & SCIENCE

Do you want to share your story or your experiences to inspire others?
GET INVOLVED – CONTACT US!
Please contact us if you are interested in helping OMC with our Encouraging Girls in Math and Science. We are looking for volunteers for following:
-Social media posts on Instagram, FB, and Twitter.
– photographers
– video: producing, filming and editing
– graphic design
-information technology
– music, artists, dancers and athletes who have an interest in mathematics and recreational mathematics.
-book club
-triagleton and other math art activities

WE NEED YOUR HELP!

ARE YOU A FLORIDA GIRL?
Do you want to cheer on girls to participate in math & science ?
Do you want to share your story or your experiences to encourage and inspire others?

BE A PART OF CHANGING THESE STATISTICS!
Higher Education
Women earned 57.3% of bachelor’s degrees in all fields in 2013 and 50.3% of science and engineering bachelor’s degrees. However, women’s participation in science and engineering at the undergraduate level is underrepresented in computer sciences (17.9%), engineering (19.3%), physical sciences (39%) and mathematics (43.1%).
Statistics are worse for minority women:
In 2012, 11.2% of bachelor’s degrees in science and engineering, 8.2% of master’s degrees in science and engineering, and 4.1% of doctorate degrees in science and engineering were awarded to minority women (NSF, Women, Minorities, and People with Disabilities in Science and Engineering, 2015).
In 2012, 3.1% of bachelor’s degrees in engineering, 6.5% of bachelor’s degrees in physical sciences, 5.4% of bachelor’s degrees in mathematics and statistics, 4.8% of bachelor’s degrees in computer sciences, 9.7% of bachelor’s degrees in biological sciences, and 14.2% of bachelor’s degrees in social sciences were awarded to minority women (NSF, Women, Minorities, and People with Disabilities in Science and Engineering, 2015).
STEM Workforce:
Women make up half of the total U.S. college-educated workforce, but only 29% of the science and engineering workforce.
Female scientists and engineers are concentrated in different occupations than are men, with relatively high shares of women in the social sciences (62%) and biological, agricultural, and environmental life sciences (48%) and relatively low shares in engineering (15%) and computer and mathematical sciences (25%). (https://nsf.gov/statistics/2016/nsb20161/#/)

GET INVOLVED – CONTACT US!

Please contact us if you are interested in helping OMC with our Encouraging Girls in Math and Science. We are looking for volunteers for following:
-Social media posts on Instagram, FB, and Twitter.
– photographers
– video: producing, filming and editing
– graphic design
-information technology
– music, artists, dancers and athletes who have an interest in mathematics and recreational mathematics.

Women In Video Series

Courtesy of Girls’ Angle

Watch “Annalisa Crannell”

Pick’s Theorem
by Bridget Tenner
Fibonacci Numbers and Mathematical Induction
by Beth Romano
Sizes of Infinite Sets
by Teena Gerhardt
The Stable Marriage Problem
by Emily Riehl
The Pigeonhole Principle
by Charmaine Sia
Tic Tac Toe on a Doughnut
by Diana Hubbard
You Won’t Win Any Races With This Geometric Series
by Lauren McGough
Is the Square Root of 2 Rational?
by Mia Minnes
On Temperature and Antipodes
by Elisenda Grigsby
The Platonic Solids
by Emily Peters
What does slicing pizza have to do with calculus?
by Joan Licata
Generating Fibonacci Numbers
by Lauren Williams
Social Networks and Graph Theory
by Vera Vertesi
Does zero point nine repeating really equal one?
by Elisenda Grigsby
Fun with Triangles, Inscribed Circles, and Angle Bisectors
by Radmila Sazdanović
Visualizing Surfaces Using Polygons
by Allison Gilmore
Adding the Numbers from 1 to 100
by Helen Wong
There are Infinitely Many Prime Numbers
by Ellen Eischen
A Proof of the Pythagorean Theorem
by Ina Petkova